Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorTrentham, John David
dc.contributor.authorMcCall, Jaison K.D.
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-31T19:50:50Z
dc.date.available2022-05-31T19:50:50Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-29
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10392/6757
dc.description.abstractThis study uniquely aims to ascertain how African American pastors, serving in predominately African American churches, perceive how the intersection of race and faith has impacted their lived experience. Furthermore, in the aftermath of prominent national cases where black people were killed in confrontations with police, this research highlights their personal and pastoral responses. Specifically related to Christian education, this study serves to inform issues associated with vocational preparation and racial reconciliation efforts among Christian schools and ministries. While African American Christians must wrestle with dueling identity consciousnesses of who they are as Christians considering cultural context, they must also reconcile whether their experiences have contributed to making them who they are and if those experiences have hindered or helped them in their pursuit of holiness. This struggle magnifies in the Black pastor, who is both African American and the undershepherd of God’s flock. Whereas the Black pastor, historically, serves in functions beyond the pulpit, the social justice lens surrounding today’s climate often results in the African American pastor at the forefront of race related conversations. The appreciation of the lived experience of Black pastors can ultimately aid in understanding the whole being, prompting further dialogue surrounding the gospel and social justice. Chapter 1 introduces the research problem and defines key terminology. Chapter 2 examines the existing literature that addresses or has implications related to the research problem. Chapter 3 is an initial summative exercise in applying the principle of inverse consistency to Crenshaw’s theory of intersectionality. Chapter 4 delineates the research design and methodology of the study. The population, samples, delimitations, limitations, instrumentation, and procedures for the study are communicated, in addition to answering why a phenomenological study approach was selected. An analysis of data and a discussion of findings is presented in chapter 5. Chapter 6 summarizes the dissertation conclusions and provides recommendations of the study.en_US
dc.subjectAfrican American pastorsen_US
dc.subjectBlack churchen_US
dc.subjectinverse consistencyen_US
dc.subjectlived experienceen_US
dc.subjectpastoral leadershipen_US
dc.subjectraceen_US
dc.titleThe Lived Experience of African American Pastors: A Phenomenological Studyen_US
dc.typeElectronic dissertationen_US
dc.typeText
dc.contributor.committeeJones, Timothy Paul
dc.contributor.committeeJones, Kevin M.
dc.type.qualificationnamePh.D.en_US
dc.publisher.institutionSouthern Baptist Theological Seminaryen_US
dc.publisher.departmentSchool of Theology


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record